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    Invelos Forums->General: General Home Theater Discussion Page: 1  Previous   Next
Harmon Kardon...do they calculate watts per channel different?
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DVD Profiler Unlimited RegistrantMysticum
Registered: June 15, 2008
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Do they calculate their watts per channel different than what other brands do? It just seems like their watts per channel is lower, but they seem to have more than enough power to run most setups. Or is it just that other brands list higher watts per channel that what they really have?
DVD Profiler Unlimited RegistrantDigitalGhost
Registered: March 13, 2007
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They use "real" watt. They calculate their watt how much watt they can produce continuously with all channels in use. Some other brands calculate the watt how much watt they can produce for a short time with only one channel in use.
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Quoting DigitalGhost:
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They use "real" watt. They calculate their watt how much watt they can produce continuously with all channels in use. Some other brands calculate the watt how much watt they can produce for a short time with only one channel in use.


Exactly what i would say. That's often a probleme with cheap manufacturers. They write a big Watt-number on the package (1000 Wmax, ...), but this means nothing.

The only thing you can compare is the W rms. This can give you a approximate comparison of the power of an amplifier, even if this also depends on what impedence you run the amplifier and to what maximal %THD (don't know the english word, in German it's called "Klirr") it's measured.

So don't look after the Power of an amplifier, but take one with a "name" and hear it before buying.
DVD Profiler Unlimited RegistrantMysticum
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Thanks for the replies, so in other world...watts per channel can be extremely misleading 
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Searched something in the web which could explain it a little bit more detailed. Didn't find something good in English, just German.

Not the best, but Ok:
http://hometheater.about.com/cs/audiocomponents/a/aapowermada.htm

More power is always good, but remember to get 1db more Loudness you have to double up the power.
DVD Profiler Unlimited RegistrantStephendl
Registered: August 17, 2007
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Actually best to check the power used rather than the power output. All sorts of bending of the truth with power output as there is no set way for companies to have to measure, but an amp uses is harder to lie about. HK are far more reputable, and often understate power, than many others who as people have said will tell you the power output of one channel.
DVD Profiler Unlimited RegistrantGLS
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Harman Kardon typically uses high current designs which allow their products a considerable amount of headroom for short term peaks. Headroom, is a reference to the difference between the RMS (or in some cases the average) power rating and the peak power that can be delivered in a short term burst. For anything but a monotone spoken recording there can be large differences between the highest and lowest sound in a recording (referred to as dynamic range). An amplifier with 0 headroom would only be able to deliver peaks slightly above the RMS or average rated power which would mean that you could only have peak sounds at that maximum level with the average being much lower (unless you don't mind considerable distortion and severe compression of the source's dynamic range). For an amplifier with a good deal of headroom it may be possible to deliver short term peaks up to 2 1/2 times the RMS power ratings or more. With this "extra" room for the short term louder peak sounds the amplifier can be run with the average level closer to it's RMS rating thereby resulting in greater overall volume. Unfortunately headroom is not a specification that all manufacturer's provide (especially when it is less than impressive).
DVD Profiler Unlimited RegistrantStar Contributorscotthm
Registered: March 20, 2007
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Quoting Mysticum:
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Thanks for the replies, so in other world...watts per channel can be extremely misleading 

Yes.  Several manufacturers might arrive at wildly different WPC numbers for the same amplifier.  One might advertise WPC (watts per channel) with all channels simultaneously driven by a 20Hz - 20kHz signal @ 0.05% THD (total harmonic distortion), while another might advertise WPC with one channel driven by a 1kHZ signal @ 1% THD.  The difference may be 30% or more WPC for the latter.

Another way to compare power amplifiers is by weight.  If two receivers have the same power "rating" but one is significantly heavier you can expect the heavier one to have a much better amplifier inside.

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