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    Invelos Forums->General: General Home Theater Discussion Page: 1 2 3  Previous   Next
Thinking about finally getting into HDTV, what do I really need?
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DVD Profiler Unlimited RegistrantStar ContributorCubbyUps
Registered: March 14, 2007
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Right now I will describe my hookup.

Comcast Cable hooked up via coaxial cable to the Digital TV Converter Box.
That is connected to my DVD recorder and the antenna out is hooked up to my analog TV.
I also have that DVD recorder, a VCR, Blu-Ray player and PS2 hooked up via RCA cables (What I think is now called Composite Cables) all to an old Sony Dolby Pro-Logic A/V received with the video going to the TV and the audio going through my Surround Sound speakers.

Other than the Blu-Ray player I have no other HD equipment.

So the questions.

1. Can I use the Comcast Converter Box, that I am currently using, to still connect to cable TV or do I really need some sort of new box from the cable company?
2. Can I still use my current setup and just connect everything up to the HDTV via the Video (Composite) cable?

I really don't care that much about HDTV but I do want to see Blu-Rays in HD quality.

Any help or suggestions?
DVD Profiler Desktop and Mobile RegistrantStar ContributorBad Father
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That's a loaded question. What you really need is a new HD Receiver, PS3 .

You should be ok with what you have as long as you can hook up your receiver to the new HDTV via Component Cable rather than Composite. Component is actually three video signals, which means you would have three phono (RCA) leads just for the video alone. With component, the first line 'Y' carries the luminance (brightness signal), the second line carries the blue level (BY) and the third carries the red level (RY). The receiver (TV, Projector, etc.) gets the green level when it combines the luminance level with the red & blue components. Composite Cable, on the other hand, is the combination of the video chrominance (colour) and luminance (brightness) all on a single cable. Composite is not used for HDTV and due to everything being combined on a single cable, the colour rendering is generally not even as good as SVHS. As you mention you are currently connected via composite cable, you won't get HD, even with an HDTV.

You can still use your Comcast Cable box but again, you won't get HD programming unless you have an HD Set Top Box.
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 Last edited: by Bad Father
DVD Profiler Unlimited RegistrantStar ContributorCubbyUps
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Yeah, at this point I really don't care about HDTV quality TV broadcasts at this time. I really am more interested in getting the HDTV Quality from my Blu-Ray player.

So if (and I assume most HDTV's have a composite video input) that I can hook up all my SD video signals via the A/V receiver output to the composite video input on the new HDTV.

And then hook up via a HDMI cable the blu-ray player directly.
Is it better to have the audio from the BR player go to the TV and it's speakers or go through the A/V receiver?
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Quoting CubbyUps:
Quote:
Is it better to have the audio from the BR player go to the TV and it's speakers or go through the A/V receiver?


To get the full force of HD audio (DTS-HD, Dolby TrueHD, PCM), you can't go wrong with an A/V receiver. If you currently have one, make sure it can handle it, though. Some older receivers can't (a few years ago and went ahead and upgraded mine).
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DVD Profiler Unlimited RegistrantStar ContributorCubbyUps
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It's an old Dolby Pro-Logic A/V receiver.

I don't really recall what inputs/outputs are on the back, but I know it's not DTS.
DVD Profiler Unlimited RegistrantStar Contributorwidescreenforever
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Quoting CubbyUps:
Quote:

I really don't care that much about HDTV but I do want to see Blu-Rays in HD quality.


Hate to burst your bubble but guess what..?  Once you get HD TV  and Have the 16:9 HD TV to boot
(either LCD / plasma) ...  You'll eventually abandon your bluray and will watch nothing BUT  Highdef Tv ... it may only take as little as ....emmmmm  maybe 2 days ....  well except..,, for the occasional special evening .... i.e. new releases ..


edit.. I'm still surprised these days at the number of people who have their BlueRay's  hooked up to 7.1 dolby surround systems with DTS and Monster cables in and Out as well as Plush furniture and multiplex surround speaker set up all to view on a 32 inch tube TV .....
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 Last edited: by widescreenforever
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Quoting CubbyUps:
Quote:
Yeah, at this point I really don't care about HDTV quality TV broadcasts at this time. I really am more interested in getting the HDTV Quality from my Blu-Ray player.

So if (and I assume most HDTV's have a composite video input) that I can hook up all my SD video signals via the A/V receiver output to the composite video input on the new HDTV.

And then hook up via a HDMI cable the blu-ray player directly.
Is it better to have the audio from the BR player go to the TV and it's speakers or go through the A/V receiver?


You can hook up the Blu-ray player directly to the HDTV via HDMI but you won't get HD audio through the TV's speakers. You'd have to disable your TV's speakers via the TV's menu and then output audio via Digital Optical to your Receiver...if it has a Digital Optical input. Again, you won't get HD Audio, but at least you can get up to Dolby Digital 5.1.

As I said previously, if your receiver doesn't have Component outputs, you can't do HD Video. But all HDTVs have composite inputs so you can hook up your SD components to your receiver then from there to the component inputs of the HDTV.
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 Last edited: by Bad Father
DVD Profiler Unlimited RegistrantStar Contributorwidescreenforever
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My brother has the same setup you suggest Max,, and I constantly tell him.. Why not just send the 7.1 sound thru hdmi to your receiver and use componant to the TV.. ? save a lot on wiring and a secondary set of wires to confuse, and make a jungle of wires either on the floor or behind the wall or the TV ....

Use the HDMI on the TV to recieve just the cable box only ... because MOST of your TV viewing does not have to be 5.1 / 7.1 to the receiver .. just dolby surround/ 5.1  for the News or the TV specials  or your favourite wednesday night TV lineup... all can readily be enjoyed without thundering woofers and 6 channel speaker volume for that part of your evening viewing venue ..
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 Last edited: by widescreenforever
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I agree with most all that has been said here, but without commenting on specific details, here is my 2 cents:

- Once you go HD, you will be disappointed at viewing SD content, regardless of the source
- SD content displayed on an HD TV is often visually less appealing than SD content on an SD TV
- Todays a/v receivers deliver stunning capabilities at a low price. I am a big fan of Onkyo. A $250 Onkyo will give you a bunch of HDMI inputs and powerful sound. There are other brands of course.

Bottom line is that I assert that you will waste money and enjoyment by trying to compromise. You will evntually give in, and wish yoiu had done it sooner. So, continue your diligent research and start saving up for the eventual purchase of a more modern a/v receiver. (Edit: I see you already have a sound system and old receiver).
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 Last edited: by mediadogg
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Quoting widescreenforever:
Quote:
My brother has the same setup you suggest Max,, and I constantly tell him.. Why not just send the 7.1 sound thru hdmi to your receiver and use componant to the TV.. ? save a lot on wiring and a secondary set of wires to confuse, and make a jungle of wires either on the floor or behind the wall or the TV ....

Use the HDMI on the TV to recieve just the cable box only ... because MOST of your TV viewing does not have to be 5.1 / 7.1 to the receiver .. just dolby surround/ 5.1  for the News or the TV specials  or your favourite wednesday night TV lineup... all can readily be enjoyed without thundering woofers and 6 channel speaker volume for that part of your evening viewing venue ..


I was just suggesting this for Cubby's benefit as none of his components are HMDI with the exception of his Blu-ray player .
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DVD Profiler Desktop and Mobile RegistrantStar ContributorBad Father
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I agree wholeheartedly with mediadogg. Save your duckies and get an HD Receiver...you won't regret it . I'm also partial to Onkyo. I have the Onkyo TX-NR708 7.2-Channel Network Receiver with a 7.1 speaker setup. I love it.
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DVD Profiler Unlimited RegistrantStar Contributorscotthm
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Quoting Bad Father:
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As I said previously, if your receiver doesn't have Component outputs, you can't do HD Video.

Blu-ray players will not output hi-def through analog (i.e. component or composite) outputs, so you have to use HDMI from the BD player to the television (either directly or via an HDMI capable receiver.)

Link

---------------
 Last edited: by scotthm
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Quoting scotthm:
Quote:
Quoting Bad Father:
Quote:
As I said previously, if your receiver doesn't have Component outputs, you can't do HD Video.

Blu-ray players will not output hi-def through analog (i.e. component or composite) outputs, so you have to use HDMI from the BD player to the television (either directly or via an HDMI capable receiver.)

Link

---------------


That doesn't take effect until January 01, 2012. The OP's current Blu-ray player doesn't have that restriction.

Albeit, the maximum resolution he will obtain via Component is 1080i.
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DVD Profiler Unlimited RegistrantStar ContributorKulju
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Quoting CubbyUps:
Quote:
Blu-Ray player and PS2 hooked up via RCA cables (What I think is now called Composite Cables)


Composite, also known as composhite  . I agree with others, tou should upgrade your receiver first.
DVD Profiler Unlimited RegistrantStar Contributorscotthm
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Quoting Bad Father:
Quote:
Quoting scotthm:
Quote:
Quoting Bad Father:
Quote:
As I said previously, if your receiver doesn't have Component outputs, you can't do HD Video.

Blu-ray players will not output hi-def through analog (i.e. component or composite) outputs, so you have to use HDMI from the BD player to the television (either directly or via an HDMI capable receiver.)

Link

That doesn't take effect until January 01, 2012. The OP's current Blu-ray player doesn't have that restriction.

From the article:
Quote:
For older players, studios can now use the ICT flag embedded onto Blu-ray discs to tell the players not to output HD over analog.

---------------
DVD Profiler Desktop and Mobile RegistrantStar ContributorBad Father
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Quoting scotthm:
Quote:
Quoting Bad Father:
Quote:
Quoting scotthm:
Quote:
Quoting Bad Father:
Quote:
As I said previously, if your receiver doesn't have Component outputs, you can't do HD Video.

Blu-ray players will not output hi-def through analog (i.e. component or composite) outputs, so you have to use HDMI from the BD player to the television (either directly or via an HDMI capable receiver.)

Link

That doesn't take effect until January 01, 2012. The OP's current Blu-ray player doesn't have that restriction.

From the article:
Quote:
For older players, studios can now use the ICT flag embedded onto Blu-ray discs to tell the players not to output HD over analog.

---------------


Can doesn't mean they will .

Besides, we're talking about the here and now. With what he has currently, it's possible to get up to 1080i. The future is another story.

We've already suggested that he future-proof himself by investing in a HD Receiver. Afterall, once he gets a taste of Hi-Def...he'll want it all .
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 Last edited: by Bad Father
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